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TIM MAIA WORLD NOBODY CAN LIVE FOREVER EXISTENTIAL SOUL LP VINYL NEW 33RPM

TIM MAIA WORLD NOBODY CAN LIVE FOREVER EXISTENTIAL SOUL LP VINYL NEW 33RPM

Regular price £25.99 Offer Price

Track Listings
1. Que Beleza
2. Let's Have a Ball Tonight
3. O Caminho Do Bem
4. Ela Partiu
5. Quer Queira, Quer Não Queira
6. Brother Father Mother Sister
7. Do Leme Ao Pontal
8. Nobody Can Live Forever
9. I Don't Care
10. Bom Senso
11. Where is My Other Half
12. Over Again
13. The Dance is Over
14. You Don t Know What I Know
15. Rational Culture

'In the early 1970''s, Brazilian popular music was approaching a high water mark of creativity and popularity. Artists like Elis Regina, Chico Buarque and Milton Nascimento were delivering top-shelf Brazilian pop, while tropicalists Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil and Os Mutantes were entertaining the college set with avant-garde fuzz-pop poetry. Enter Tim Maia with a massive cannonball into the pool. It was the only dive Tim knew. Standing just 5''7 (6'' with the Afro) Tim Maia was large, in charge and completely out of control. He was the personification of rock star excess, having lived through five marriages and at least six children, multiple prison sentences, voluminous drug habits and a stint in an UFO obsessed religious cult. Tim is also remembered as a fat, arrogant, overindulgent, barely tolerated, yet beloved man-child who died too young at the age of 55. Sebastio Rodrigues Maia was born in Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, on September 28, 1942. In 1957, at the age of 17, the singer went to America. He left home with $12 in his pocket and no knowledge of English. He adopted the name ''Jimmy'' and lied to the immigration authorities, saying that he was a student. Living with distant cousins in Tarrytown, New York, he worked odd jobs and committed petty crimes. Having a prodigious ear he quickly learned to speak, sing and write songs in English. He formed a small vocal group called The Ideals who even recorded one of Tim''s songs, "New Love." Intent on starting a career in America, Tim never planned on going back to Brazil, but like a badass Forrest Gump, he also had a knack for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. In a 1964 early pre-cursor to Spring Break''s modern debauchery, Tim was busted in Daytona, Florida for smoking pot in a stolen car and served six months in prison. U.S. Immigration caught up with him and he was deported. Tim''s first commercial records showed that a black Brazilian singer could assert his identity with confidence and power. His music helped to build the Black Rio movement, a new Afro-Brazilian music culture influenced by the U.S. civil rights struggle. As a result, Tim Maia''s soul music described a modern Black Brazilian identity that blew the doors off mass culture''s tightly circumscribed role for Afro-Brazilians. A funny thing happened when Tim Maia launched his career in Brazil: he kept on writing and recording songs in English. Every album (all titled Tim Maia with only the copyright years to differentiate) included at least one, if not a few songs in English. Obviously, Tim "Jimmy" Maia''s teenage dreams of international soul success didn''t die when he was deported from the U.S. In 1971, fresh from the big hit of his first album, Timwent to London and spoiled himself. He smoked, inhaled, drank, traveled on acid, listened to music, argued with his wife and returned to Brazil with 200 doses of LSD to distribute amongst his friends. As soon as he arrived, he went to (recording company) Philip