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FELA KUTI #3 CURATED BY BRIAN ENO LP VINYL NEW 33RPM BOX SET 2014

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Original price £109.99 - Original price £109.99
Original price
£109.99
£109.99 - £109.99
Current price £109.99
Cat no. KFR4004-1
Knitting Factory Records is proud to release the third of the long-awaited vinyl reissues from the Fela Kuti catalog. Limited to 2000 pieces. These seven albums were chosen by long-time admirer, Brian Eno.
-London Scene (1971)
-Shakara (1972)
-Gentleman (1973)
-Afrodisiac (1973)
-Zombie (1976)
-Upside Down (1976)
-I.T.T. (1980)
Also included with the box set:
-12?x 12? 12 page book that includes a forward from Brian Eno, album notes from Chris May, translated lyrics, and photos from Bernard Matussiere
-16.5?x 22.5? poster

Fela's discography stretches from the mid 1960s with Fela Ransome Kuti & His Highlife Rakers, to the early 1990s with Egypt 80, and there are masterpieces all along the way. But the 1970s, with Africa 70 and then Afrika 70, was the decade during which Fela's Afrobeat went through its most dramatic changes - musically and politically.

Says Box set curator, Brian Eno, "Before about mid-September 1973 I didn't have much interest in polyrhythmic music. I didn't really get it. That all changed one Autumn day when I walked into Stern's Record Shop off Tottenham Court Road. For reasons I've long forgotten, I left the store with an album that was to change my life dramatically. It was Afrodisiac by Fela Ransome-Kuti (as he was then known) and his band The Africa 70. I remember the first time I listened and how dazzled I was by the groove and the rhythmic complexity, and by the raw, harsh sounds of the brass, like Mack trucks hurtling across highways with their horns blaring. Everything I thought I knew about music at that point was up in the air again. The sheer force and drive of this wild Nigerian stuff blew my mind. My friend Robert Wyatt called it 'Jazz from another planet' - and suddenly I thought I understood the point of jazz, until then an almost alien music to me."